Category Archives: Cryogenic Treatment

Glass-Filled PEEK Coupling Rings Banner

Case Study: Cryogenic Deflashing for Glass-Filled PEEK Coupling Rings

Nitrofreeze® cryogenic deflashing removes flash from glass-filled PEEK coupling rings. This fast, efficient and consistent finishing process uses gaseous nitrogen to freeze the parts and plastic media to break-off surface imperfections and excess material. Because it’s a batch process, cryogenic deflashing eliminates manual deflashing such as hand trimming for faster throughputs and reduced labor costs. […]

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Silicone Bumper Stopcs

Case Study: Cryogenic Deflashing for Silicone Bumper Stops

Nitrofreeze® cryogenic deflashing removes flash from silicone bumper stops. This fast, consistent and cost-effective process uses gaseous nitrogen to freeze the parts and plastic media to break-off surface imperfections and excess material. Thanks to batch processing, cryogenic deflashing can also reduce lead times and labor costs. The Challenge Nitrofreeze was asked to remove flashing from […]

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Silicone Bumper Stopcs

Nitrofreeze® Proof of Concept Case Study- Silicone Block

Nitrofreeze® Deflashing and Deburring process adds value while reducing costs to customers by eliminating the need for hand trimming. Highlighted below is an actual customer part that has successfully undergone the Nitrofreeze® process. Material : Silicone Description : Gray Rectangular Block Area for Concern : OD and ID Flash Results : The rectangular silicone blocks were excellent candidates […]

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Cryogenic Treatment of Speaker Wire

Over the years we have cryo treated many different applications from almost every industry. The processing of audio equipment has become a mainstay for our cryogenic treatment business. In 2007 and 2008 we cryo treated 10,000+ audio tubes, over a ton of speaker wire, several hundred amplifiers and thousands of connectors. Since that time, the […]

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Cryogenic Treatment for Drill Bits

Every Friday we start our processor and complete a weekend run. We load the parts in and then set our process parameters for the run. We use ramps that go down no more than a degree per minute and we hold all the parts at -300°F for a total of 24 hours. Upon completion of […]

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